Author Topic: What buddha says about death  (Read 8023 times)

TheCreator

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What buddha says about death
« on: July 31, 2008, 04:36:47 PM »
According to Buddha,Our life is a journey while death is a return to earth.
The universe is like an inn.
The passing years are like dust.
Regard this phantom world
As a star at dawn, a bubble in a stream,
A flash of lightning in a summer cloud,
A flickering lamp - a phantom - and a dream

catowoman

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2011, 08:50:46 AM »
I learned from our Humanity class before that based on Buddhism, when we die and we live again on earth as another being, our next existence depends on how we lived our present life. Good karma will lead to good rebirth in our next life.

From Buddhism, it seems that beings never die and living never stops because as we die we return to earth only as different being without knowledge of what we are before. We again go to another journey.

I wonder if I am right.

R. Paradon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2012, 04:11:19 AM »
I learned from our Humanity class before that based on Buddhism, when we die and we live again on earth as another being, our next existence depends on how we lived our present life. Good karma will lead to good rebirth in our next life.

From Buddhism, it seems that beings never die and living never stops because as we die we return to earth only as different being without knowledge of what we are before. We again go to another journey.

I wonder if I am right.

You are right and you are wrong!   ???  It is true that we do reincarnate to another life but it is only to learn and to even Karma.  Some day when we attain enlightenment then the cycle will end and we become part of God or whatever you want to call the higher power.  Now according to my beliefs, during the time between lives we discuss our past life and see determine what we need to improve in our next one.  Where we will be born, financial status, how and when we will die, etc.  We do not have memory of this because if we did, it would be too easy to breeze through the next life.

Sandra Piddock

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2012, 12:44:22 PM »
You are right and you are wrong!   ???  It is true that we do reincarnate to another life but it is only to learn and to even Karma.  Some day when we attain enlightenment then the cycle will end and we become part of God or whatever you want to call the higher power.  Now according to my beliefs, during the time between lives we discuss our past life and see determine what we need to improve in our next one.  Where we will be born, financial status, how and when we will die, etc.  We do not have memory of this because if we did, it would be too easy to breeze through the next life.

This seems like a great way to live and die, with each life being a sort of practice run for the main event, which is enlightenment and an invite to share in the higher power for eternity. It gives life a real purpose, and because we never remember our past mistakes, we can't 'cheat' our way into Heaven - or wherever we're destined for.

jackydragon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2012, 01:59:09 AM »
You are right and you are wrong!   ???  It is true that we do reincarnate to another life but it is only to learn and to even Karma.  Some day when we attain enlightenment then the cycle will end and we become part of God or whatever you want to call the higher power.  Now according to my beliefs, during the time between lives we discuss our past life and see determine what we need to improve in our next one.  Where we will be born, financial status, how and when we will die, etc.  We do not have memory of this because if we did, it would be too easy to breeze through the next life.

What do you mean we become a part of God? Are we not already? What are we improving?

R. Paradon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2012, 06:16:23 AM »
What do you mean we become a part of God? Are we not already? What are we improving?

Hi jackydragon!

Sure we are all part of God.  But until we learn to live a life of compassion and equal out our Karma we will probably have many more lifetimes.

When you ask "What are we improving?" I have to think that either you are a very perfect person and I admire you for that or you are a present Buddha in which the question would not be asked.  Seriously, is there nothing in your life that could use improving?

jackydragon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2012, 12:36:32 PM »
Hi R Paradon,

Okay cool so Buddhist teach we are all a part of God.

We also need to learn how to live a life of compassion in order to balance out our Karma and eliminate the need to have another life or other lives...this I get.

What I don't get is this. 

"Now according to my beliefs, during the time between lives we discuss our past life and see determine what we need to improve in our next one"

If the whole point of returning is to learn compassion and balance Karma, what needs improving except our ability to be compassionate? What does our location, financial status and external environment have to do with learning compassion? Compassion is an internal event that can be learned whether we live in poverty or wealth. Whether we are disabled or able.

Perfect is an ideal constructed by comparing this from that. The concept of perfect is highly dependent on ones perception and will differ from one person to the next. When we do not live in the moment we are often not accepting of "what is" and striving to be perfect (or improve our external environment) comes into play.

When we are aware of more of "what is" that which we might have strived for no longer needs effort.

No I do not think I am perfect in the sense you are asking. Of course there are areas that need improving however for me they are internal improvements not outer ones.






zerospin

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2012, 02:28:15 PM »
According to Buddha,Our life is a journey while death is a return to earth.
The universe is like an inn.
The passing years are like dust.
Regard this phantom world
As a star at dawn, a bubble in a stream,
A flash of lightning in a summer cloud,
A flickering lamp - a phantom - and a dream

I like this, very poetic :)

As far as I understand Buddhism (I'm agnostic and an ex-Christian), it teaches that once you die you are reborn into another form of life which depends on your karma and deeds in the last one. It is a very interesting notion. However it crumbles under closer examination. Such a reincarnation process would be meaningless. Since a reborn soul can not remember the past life, it can not know what sins or good deeds it committed in the past, therefore it can't begin to try to fix them. Only if the memory was retained through reincarnation, would such a journey make a sense and be purposeful. Also, if Hitler was reborn as an amoeba, how in earth could he ever perform good deeds to redeem himself? :)

R. Paradon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2012, 10:38:17 AM »


What I don't get is this. 

"Now according to my beliefs, during the time between lives we discuss our past life and see determine what we need to improve in our next one"

If the whole point of returning is to learn compassion and balance Karma, what needs improving except our ability to be compassionate? What does our location, financial status and external environment have to do with learning compassion? Compassion is an internal event that can be learned whether we live in poverty or wealth. Whether we are disabled or able.

As far as location, financial, etc. goes I think it goes back to that old saying of walking a mile in another persons shoes.  This lifetime I am a white gay male person.   Perhaps in my last or previous life I was a homophobic and caused damage to gay people.  Now I am here to experience this life and understand what being gay is about.  The same if I hate a particular race or group of people perhaps the next time I will be one of them.

******************

"Perfect is an ideal constructed by comparing this from that. The concept of perfect is highly dependent on ones perception and will differ from one person to the next. When we do not live in the moment we are often not accepting of "what is" and striving to be perfect (or improve our external environment) comes into play."

You are correct.  When I used the word perfect in was in a general sense.




R. Paradon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2012, 10:50:04 AM »


As far as I understand Buddhism (I'm agnostic and an ex-Christian), it teaches that once you die you are reborn into another form of life which depends on your karma and deeds in the last one. It is a very interesting notion. However it crumbles under closer examination. Such a reincarnation process would be meaningless. Since a reborn soul can not remember the past life, it can not know what sins or good deeds it committed in the past, therefore it can't begin to try to fix them. Only if the memory was retained through reincarnation, would such a journey make a sense and be purposeful. Also, if Hitler was reborn as an amoeba, how in earth could he ever perform good deeds to redeem himself? :)

If we do examine between lives what is needed to have a better one this time as far as our actions and thoughts I am sure that we we are reborn we have an internal - preconceived perhaps - knowledge of right and wrong.

As far as Hitler and others like him, I am not sure what he will return as.  It would take many incarnations as a one celled being before he evolves higher.  A problem with human thinking -  myself included - is that we only want to perceive what we have the ability to understand.

I appreciate you questions!

jackydragon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2012, 11:27:31 AM »
As far as location, financial, etc. goes I think it goes back to that old saying of walking a mile in another persons shoes.  This lifetime I am a white gay male person.   Perhaps in my last or previous life I was a homophobic and caused damage to gay people.  Now I am here to experience this life and understand what being gay is about.  The same if I hate a particular race or group of people perhaps the next time I will be one of them.

******************

"Perfect is an ideal constructed by comparing this from that. The concept of perfect is highly dependent on ones perception and will differ from one person to the next. When we do not live in the moment we are often not accepting of "what is" and striving to be perfect (or improve our external environment) comes into play."

You are correct.  When I used the word perfect in was in a general sense.


Oh I get what you are saying.

I wonder if this review period you were talking about in a previous post is more about reviewing how the Karma came about? Being able to review the cause and become more aware about the effects that are yet to be endured to balance the Karma? Not actual time place and location type thing? If the details were available then it would mean that the next life is predetermined which I don't think it is.

R. Paradon

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Re: What buddha says about death
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2012, 04:14:50 AM »

Oh I get what you are saying.

I wonder if this review period you were talking about in a previous post is more about reviewing how the Karma came about? Being able to review the cause and become more aware about the effects that are yet to be endured to balance the Karma? Not actual time place and location type thing? If the details were available then it would mean that the next life is predetermined which I don't think it is.

Hi jacky!
Sorry for my late reply.  I think that before we are reborn, yes we do go over what is needed to improve our Karma and certain details such as death, illness etc, are discussed.  However, if we take what is in our heart during the next life we can eliminate the things that may cause us despair but if we just go on and not change then we will experience life as preplanned.  So our next life is predetermined but we can adjust it along the way.

And again, I will repeat that I am not a monk.  Everything that I say is what I believe and not verified...that is up to you!  :)
« Last Edit: March 05, 2012, 04:16:28 AM by R. Paradon »


 

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