Author Topic: Zen Buddhist Story  (Read 4098 times)

catowoman

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Zen Buddhist Story
« on: December 23, 2011, 08:32:19 AM »
Two monks, going to a neighbouring monastery, walked side by side in silence. They arrived at a river they had to cross. That season, waters were higher than usual. On the bank, a young woman was hesitating and asked the younger of the two monks for help. He exclaimed, 'Don't you see that I am a monk, that I took a vow of chastity?'

'I require nothing from you that could impede your vow, but simply to help me to cross the river,'
replied the young woman with a little smile.

'I...not...I can...do nothing for you,' said the embarrassed young monk.

'It doesn't matter,' said the elderly monk. 'Climb on my back and we will cross together.'

Having reached the other bank, the old monk put down the young woman who, in return, thanked him with a broad smile. She left her side and both monks continued their route in silence. Close to the monastery, the young monk could not stand it anymore and said, 'You shouldn't have carried that person on your back. It's against our rules.'

'This young woman needed help and I put her down on the other bank. You didn't carry her at all, but she is still on your back,' replied the older monk.

catowoman

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Re: Zen Buddhist Story
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2011, 08:35:34 AM »
This beautiful story was told to us in a mass by our priest. That was years ago. I would sometimes reflect on this story for my own enlightenment.  :)

technautilus

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Re: Zen Buddhist Story
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2011, 05:55:10 AM »
This illustrates one of the most important points in Buddhism that all people should learn. Sometimes being flexible and willing to break a very strict rule puts less on your mind than upholding it. When someone requests help, you should aid them regardless of your opinion or disagreements with them.

soffty

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Re: Zen Buddhist Story
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 08:58:29 PM »
In fact, if a person is truly spiritual, they are on the road to enlightenment. An enlightened person will not only help any person, they will help their enemies. Even when he/she knows that it will cost much. The reality is that cost is an illusion. Their is nothing that is a true cost...except that which may lead to a victim...especially a family member.

Death is part of our purpose in life. Without it, we would be stuck as we are. Death gives us the ability to use science to harness the positive/negative charges and vibration...so that we may empower the soul. Truth is simple math, yet there is a reason why we fear truth. the answers to your questions are available.

Wade 

DiminishingInsanity

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Re: Zen Buddhist Story
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2012, 11:28:48 PM »
I always enjoy hearing Buddhist stories.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2012, 08:32:33 AM by DiminishingInsanity »
Namaste

soffty

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Re: Zen Buddhist Story
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2012, 12:06:02 AM »
In a land near India, long ago, a king ruled. It is common that rulers indulge themselves, as few people achieve enlightenment as a ruler. This king had sex with palace slaves, as was the norm. It would not be hard to visualize a situation where a ruler had access to the most beautiful young women. But it would be rare for a religion to allow this truth to be its foundation.

The king fell in love with one such slave, and she became pregnant. It was not the first time such a thing happened, and the king always inflicted a death penalty upon the newborn. But this time he was truly in love. The slave demanded that the king not kill her child, and told him that if he did, she would kill herself. So the king made a promise.

It would be hard to believe that a king would submit to the wishes of a slave girl. The best a slave might achieve would be some form of compromise. The king kept his promise, but on his terms.

The newborn was taken away from the mother, and put into a room. For 18 years, the child was kept in a chair...constantly served by a group of servants. He stayed that way the entire time...never doing anything for himself. All he knew were the few servants and the four walls of the room...which had a doorway.

On the 18th birthday of the child, it weighed between 400 and 500 pounds. It could not walk. It was wheeled out the front door of the palace, and left on the steps...in a wagon. As it sat in the wagon, it saw...for the first time...the sky...townspeople...movement of the air...trees...houses...and shops. This child would become the spiritual leader of the world.

Wade

Hardison

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Re: Zen Buddhist Story
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2012, 12:11:02 AM »
I love the story in the OP. The story was a simple one, but the message was very profound. Beautiful.


 

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